Latest Work

Hello, I am trying something new with my website. I mostly tend to my Flickr gallery at this point, so to reduce the upkeep and redundancy, I am using the Flickr API to pull my latest images straight from my gallery over there. Clicking on any image will simply take you to its page within my Flickr gallery (external link).

A categorical listing of work, separated into albums, is located here (external link).


AM 1705-773

AM 1705-773

A flocculent spiral galaxy with some of our own galaxy’s flocculence in front of it. If you look to the lower right corner, you can see it’s a bit darker and muddy-colored. That’s our Milky Way’s dust. It’s thick enough that it seems to completely obscure some of the distant spiral in visible light. It is difficult to tell where our galaxy ends and the external galaxy begins, which almost makes it look like it’s attached.

None of the regular color surveys I usually check have contained this galaxy, but color data was kindly provided by William Keel, which he gathered using the remotely-operated SARA 24-inch telescope at Cerro Tololo in Chile.

NASA/ESA/William Keel/Judy Schmidt

HST Proposal:
Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

Luminosity: ACS/WFC F606W
Red: r
Green: v
Blue: b

North is 8.42° clockwise from up.


AM 1229-512

AM 1229-512

A super faint edge-on disk galaxy, and somewhat of an enigma. How it formed like this and how its frontal morphology might appear are subject to speculation, but chances are if we saw it from a sufficiently inclined vantage point, it would be practically invisible beyond its nucleus, assuming what we see is spread out fairly evenly along the disk and not concentrated along some very skinny arms.

Anyway, I’m happy to simply enjoy yet another wonderful variation that nature has given us.

HST Proposal:
Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

All channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 16.50° counter-clockwise from up.


UGC 4459

UGC 4459

A dwarf galaxy dataset I put together after being woken up by my cat, Tofu. I was unable to get back to sleep, so I decided to make myself useful.

This was put together using some custom drizzled data made by Meredith Durbin, attribution as follows:
NASA/ESA/Meredith Durbin/Judy Schmidt

Regarding the processing: The near-infrared data doesn’t cover the entire image. It is smaller and diagonally positioned in a way that leaves three of the corners uncovered.

That data came from these proposals:
Quantifying Star Formation and Feedback: The M81 Group Dwarf Galaxies
A Calibration Database for Stellar Models of Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

Red: WFC3/IR F110W+WFC3/IR F160W
Orange: ACS/WFC F814W
Cyan: ACS/WFC F555W

North is 32.50° clockwise from up.


AM 0218-321

AM 0218-321

An interesting interaction which resulted in some rather long tidal streams outstretched from a spiral galaxy like arms. I’m not sure they could be considered as part of the arms or just streams.

I used Dark Energy Survey DR1 for color. Not quite sure on the filters for that. Will have to update the description when I figure it out, but it looks like a typical combination of near-infrared / red / green filters. I took the image straight off legacysurvey.org’s viewer since I’m having trouble getting data access. Seems my email isn’t working tonight.

If you take a look at the DES DR1 data in the legacysurvey viewer you can see there is a transient of some type near the center of the spiral galaxy. Could be a supernova, or it could just be a sneaky asteroid. It’s hard to tell without a date/time for the observation that captured the transient, though.

NASA/ESA/DES DR1/Legacy Survey/Judy Schmidt

HST Proposal:
Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

Luminosity: ACS/WFC F606W
Red: DES DR1 z
Green: DES DR1 r
Blue: DES DR1 g

North is 25.17° counter-clockwise from up.


Holmberg I (UGC 5139)

Holmberg I (UGC 5139)

A low surface brightness irregular dwarf galaxy which is extensively studied as far as dwarf galaxies go. Individual stars and stellar systems are all easily resolved by HST for this galaxy. A few fuzzy blue patches of glowing gas are visible, clearly indicating that some star formation is happening. Dozens of background galaxies dot the image in reddish hues, and among the background galaxies is a coincidental arrangement of needle-like edgewise spirals gathering near the center of the image.

This was put together using some custom drizzled data made by Meredith Durbin, attribution as follows:
NASA/ESA/Meredith Durbin/Judy Schmidt

Regarding the processing: The near-infrared data doesn’t cover the entire image. It is smaller and diagonally positioned in a way that leaves the corners uncovered.

That data came from these proposals:
Quantifying Star Formation and Feedback: The M81 Group Dwarf Galaxies
A Calibration Database for Stellar Models of Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

Red: WFC3/IR F110W+WFC3/IR F160W
Orange: ACS/WFC F606W
Cyan: ACS/WFC F475W

North is 34.87° clockwise from up.


Arp163

Arp163

A dwarf galaxy bustling with star formation, as evidenced by the tendrils of emission nebula appearing green here due to the choice of filters. The emission must be very strong indeed, for it is visible even in wideband color. A narrowband filter would bring out a lot of details in the nebula.

In my own mind I call these star seams due to their linear appearance and the way the nebula tends to look like it is flowing out from the vein of star formation. You can see a spectacular example of one of these with appropriate narrowband filters included here: flic.kr/p/pTDvDs

Color comes from this SDSS field:
dr12.sdss.org/fields/name?name=arp+163

HST Proposal:
Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

Luminosity: ACS/WFC F606W
Red: SDSS i
Green: SDSS r
Blue: SDSS g

North is 20.91° clockwise from up.


UGC 8508

UGC 8508

A lovely spheroidal dwarf galaxy. Visually, the younger, bluer stars appear near the center, while an older, redder population appears on the outskirts. Interesting. I think this is typical for these spheroidal dwarfs, but I haven’t taken much notice to it.

I tried to include as much as I could on the right, but unfortunately the nice data is cut off right about there. The galaxy continues more or less symmetrically to the right. Note the IR data did not cover the entire image, so the parts in the upper left and lower left that look kind of yellow and lack red are where that ended.

Apparently I already processed this one a while back but I forgot. Well it looks way better with Meredith’s data, that’s for sure.

This was put together using some custom drizzled data made by Meredith Durbin, attribution as follows:
NASA/ESA/Meredith Durbin/Judy Schmidt

That data came from these proposals:
ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey
A Calibration Database for Stellar Models of Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

Red: WFC3/IR F110W+WFC3/IR F160W
Green: ACS/WFC F606W
Blue: ACS/WFC F475W


North is 32.32° clockwise from up.


Arp 264

Arp 264

A soft, fluffy, irregular dwarf galaxy with a few areas of star formation. Could be a nice place to live.

NASA/ESA/SDSS/Judy Schmidt

Color comes from this SDSS field:
dr12.sdss.org/fields/name?name=arp+264

HST Proposal:
Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

Luminosity: ACS/WFC F606W
Red: SDSS i
Green: SDSS r
Blue: SDSS g

North is 59.29° counter-clockwise from up.


UGCA 292 (CVn I dwA)

UGCA 292 (CVn I dwA)

An extremely metal-poor dwarf galaxy located relatively nearby in the Canes Venatici constellation. It lies around 44 arcminutes west of the Whale Galaxy. Hubble is great for resolving individual stars in these tiny, nearby galaxies. A bright, whiteish foreground star from our own Milky Way appears just left and below center, while a much larger elliptical galaxy lies far in the background near the top of the frame. Numerous other distant galaxies also dot the background.

This object is not to be confused with Canes Venatici I (CVn I dSph) which is actually a known satellite of the Milky Way. These are named ambiguously, and it’s annoying.

This was put together using some custom drizzled data made by Meredith Durbin, attribution as follows:
NASA/ESA/Meredith Durbin/Judy Schmidt

Two more of Julianne Dalcanton’s proposals were responsible for the observations that resulted in this image:
ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey
A Calibration Database for Stellar Models of Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

Red: WFC3/IR F110W+WFC3/IR F160W
Red-Orange: ACS/WFC F814W
Green: ACS/WFC F606W
Blue: ACS/WFC F475W

North is 32.02° clockwise from up.


Arp300

Arp300

A spiral galaxy, an edge-on disk, a few other background goodies, and a remarkable pair of dwarf galaxies. The bright pair near the right side of the frame could be an interacting pair, or, interestingly perhaps an overlapping line-of-sight pair, though I really have no way of confirming that. Pay close attention to the reddish/yellowish dust around that bright nucleus at the bottom. See how it encircles the nucleus without looking all that disturbed? Maybe they aren’t interacting. Or maybe if they are, it’s at an early point. Either way, it’s very interesting to see backlit dust in the outskirts of a galaxy. It’s usually invisible to us at these wavelengths.

Color comes from PanSTARRS this time.

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

Luminosity: ACS/WFC F606W
Red: PanSTARRS z
Green: PanSTARRS i
Blue: PanSTARRS g

North is 24.50° clockwise from up.


There are more pictures at my Flickr Gallery (external link)