Latest Work

Hello, I am trying something new with my website. I mostly tend to my Flickr gallery at this point, so to reduce the upkeep and redundancy, I am using the Flickr API to pull my latest images straight from my gallery over there. Clicking on any image will simply take you to its page within my Flickr gallery (external link).

A categorical listing of work, separated into albums, is located here (external link).


NGC 1175

NGC 1175

A disk galaxy, I want to say lenticular, but SIMBAD notes it as a spiral? Well, sometimes it is hard to tell. The important part of this galaxy is its magnificent bowtie. The stars in this galaxy’s X-shaped nucleus are not orbiting in simple ellipses, but rather in a looping, figure eight path. This is something I need to learn more about before I say much more.

This galaxy was imaged as part of the Zoo Gems project.
Gems of the Galaxy Zoos

All Channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 93.80° counter-clockwise from up.


Arp 70

Arp 70

Tidal interaction between two galaxies. There seems to be a mini overlapper in the lower right corner. A nice, widefield color view is available at the Legacy Surveys Viewer: legacysurvey.org/viewer?ra=20.8636&dec=30.7820&zo…

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

All Channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 21.04° counter-clockwise from up.


NGC 4111

NGC 4111

Five years ago I processed this galaxy, but it was from an older WFPC2 dataset. I was checking up on the latest releases to the archive and recognized this fancy little lenticular enigma and decided to revisit it in its latest iteration, this time from WFC3/UVIS & IR. It does take a bit of harsh processing to help bring out the dust detail, but I feel that the destructive nature of such processing is outweighed by the benefit of clarity. Anyway, I really enjoy the way the ring of dust encircles the nucleus of the galaxy perpendicularly to the disk. Everyone has their history.

Data from the following proposal were used to create this image:
Addressing a Bias in the Galaxies with Black Hole Mass Measurements

Luminosity: Average of WFC3/UVIS F814W & WFC3/UVIS F475W
Red: WFC3/IR F160W
Green: WFC3/UVIS F814W
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F475W

North is 5.28° counter-clockwise from up.


AM 2029-544

AM 2029-544

Two irregularly shaped galaxies, both swirling about one another in an ongoing interaction. Pockets of star formation dot both, stippling the cosmic canvas with clusters of young stars.

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

All Channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 25.79° clockwise from up.


Arp 130

Arp 130

Not sure there is any interaction going on, here. Looks a bit like a smooth elliptical or lenticular galaxy viewed face-on in front of a barred spiral galaxy. That doesn’t mean they can’t be in some early stage of interaction. I just don’t see any signs of tidal tails or obvious irregularity, especially from the bottom galaxy. Whatever the case, it creates a beautiful scene.

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

All Channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 13.79° counter-clockwise from up.


AM 2353-291

AM 2353-291

A fortuitous observation of two smooth colliding galaxies which happen to host a type Ia supernova that erupted at least 5 days prior. SN 2019fkq can be seen as a bright pinpoint nestled between the cores of the two bright galaxies. Also visible in the left galaxy is a disk of dust encircling the nucleus, and numerous globular clusters are scattered about.

With the supernova measured at a redshift of .045, that puts these two galaxies at about 612 million light years away, and around 230000 light years across at the widest point. Two Milky Ways could fit across them.

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

All Channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 29.71° counter-clockwise from up.


AM 0001-505

AM 0001-505

Sometimes the detector just isn’t quite big enough. Two spirals; one fell off the edge. The telescope seems to have been preferentially pointed towards the more irregularly shaped spiral. Did the southern galaxy pass by the northern one recently and pull on its arms to get it this way, or was there something we can no longer see?

The southern galaxy looks so regular that I would doubt it interacted with anything recently if I saw it by itself.

Maybe there wasn’t any interaction. Maybe that’s just how they’re both shaped.

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

All Channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 35.34° clockwise from up.


UGC 7064

UGC 7064

A Zoo Gem! Dust lanes from a spiral galaxy illuminated from behind by two galactic nuclei. Whether or not the two bulges belong to distinct galaxies or the same one, I know not. Given the left one’s extra reddening, it would seem reasonable to conclude it is located further behind than the one on the right. The left bulge is called UGC 7064C, while the right one is called UGC7064A or B. I’m not sure why that happened.

Zoo Gems is an offshoot of the Galaxy Zoo project seeking to take some detailed observations of some unique objects collectively discovered by volunteers. I hope to do some more of these when I have the time. They may still be a little small and blurry even with HST, but they are still highly interesting and unusual peeks into the Universe.

Color comes from Legacy Surveys DR8.

NASA/ESA/Legacy Surveys DR8/Judy Schmidt

Data from the following proposal were used to create this image:
Gems of the Galaxy Zoos

Luminosity: ACS/WFC F606W
Red: Legacy Surveys z
Green: Legacy Surveys r
Blue: Legacy Surveys g

North is 6.1° counter-clockwise from up.


AM 0643-462

AM 0643-462

Looks like a small friend can have a big effect on a larger galaxy. This interaction is reminiscent of the Cartwheel system, but perhaps earlier in the process. We can still make out what used to be spiral arms becoming offset from the nucleus, and beginning to run into one another to become a ring. As with the Cartwheel, streams of gas can be seen emanating from the center like spokes.

The smaller galaxy at the lower right has its own changes, but they are much fainter and therefore more subtle to observe. I tried to make the tidal streams apparent enough to see, but depending on what kind of screen you are viewing on and how dark your room is, it may or may not be hard.

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

All Channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 45.18° clockwise from up.


AM 1332-331

AM 1332-331

Two remarkably smooth galaxies performing the gravitationally choreographed merger dance with no apparent dust or star formation regions to be seen. Structural organization indicates discoid morphology for both with arms and a bar on the western member, but one wonders whether any disc will remain when things settle into their new order.

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

All Channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 32.71° clockwise from up.


There are more pictures at my Flickr Gallery (external link)