Latest Work

Hello, I am trying something new with my website. I mostly tend to my Flickr gallery at this point, so to reduce the upkeep and redundancy, I am using the Flickr API to pull my latest images straight from my gallery over there. Clicking on any image will simply take you to its page within my Flickr gallery (external link).

A categorical listing of work, separated into albums, is located here (external link).


IC 342, Hidden Galaxy

IC 342, Hidden Galaxy

Famously overlooked grand design spiral galaxy IC 342 as seen last year (2019 Oct) by Hubble. It is situated rather close to the plane of our own galaxy, making it difficult to discern through all the dust and stars between us and it. It’s similar in size to the Triangulum Galaxy, but dimmed so much by dust that it wasn’t discovered until a couple hundred years later. Joint observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory are ongoing as astronomers survey for various x-ray emitting stellar sources within the galaxy.

Data from the following proposal were used to create this image:
The Giant Hiding in Our Backyard: The Nearby Spiral Starburst Galaxy IC 342

This was my first attempt at assembling a mosaic using Astrodrizzle. I don’t yet know how to align different filter sets to one another, but the mosaic assembly was much simplified by letting the software take care of it. It’s misaligned by maybe half a pixel in some places, and less than that overall. Not perfect, but I will continue to learn.

I increased the saturation substantially for the final image. Cyans were shifted to slightly bluer hues using Camera Raw. Small triangles were filled with cloned data in all four corners in an attempt to eke just a little more overall data into the frame.

Red: ACS/WFC F606W
Green: Pseudo
Blue: ACS/WFC F435W

North is up.


Arp 91

Arp 91

Another interacting pair of galaxies from the prolific Proposition 15446 for your consideration.

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

All Channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 9.12° counter-clockwise from up.


NGC 346

NGC 346

Got into a bit of a fake / joke argument with Cory Schmitz over on Twitter about the Small Magellenic Cloud being boring, and realized I didn’t have much imagery from the SMC! This addition will make two. The SMC isn’t necessarily boring, but it is, well, smaller, and has perhaps fewer things going on in it. But those things are still just as wonderful to look at! This is an active star-forming region with central a bright, blueish star cluster, and also an overlapping, older, redder cluster near the top. The cluster near the top looks kind of like one of those more diffuse globular clusters, but I looked around and couldn’t find anyone calling it that. Anyway, it’s surely one of the most beautiful vistas in our cosmic neighborhood.

Wispy, cloud-like structures are always associated with star formation, and here all the soft pinks and blues are gas giving off its own glow after getting energized by the very bright, newly formed stars. Dark clouds are places where dust is thick enough that light from any glowing gas and stars is being blocked. Sometimes the dust likes to blend into the background darkness of the sky, and we can’t even tell it’s there in visible wavelengths.

This particular dataset is very interesting to work with because there is a 2004 set and a 2015 set, giving an 11 year difference to compare the two. It’s really fun to blink the two back and forth and find all the stars with high proper motions, a few variable stars, and even an apparent dust-enshrouded star either brightening, or becoming exposed out of its dusty envelope. Not sure what’s going on there, but I did make an animation about it that I posted over at Twitter.

One thing I gotta do here is pay tribute to this earlier version of the image, processed years before I ever started doing this:
hubblesite.org/contents/news-releases/2005/news-2005-35.html

It’s a pretty challenging set of filters to work with, and it’s very easy to get some very out of balance colors out of it. So, kudos to those past and future who attempt this one.

Data from the following proposals were used to create this image:
Current star formation in young, compact clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud
A 3D view of massive cluster formation in the SMC

50% Luminosity layer: ACS/WFC F685N
Red screen: ACS/WFC F685N
Red: ACS/WFC F814W
Green: Pseudo
Blue: ACS/WFC F555W

North is 2.5° clockwise from up.


Venus, January 1995

Venus, January 1995

Did you know Hubble looked at Venus? I didn’t. On a whim, after the Mars image, I wondered if Hubble was even allowed to target Venus, given its close proximity to the Sun. Interestingly, this is the first and last time Hubble ever looked at Venus, other than for various spectroscopic observations over the years.

It’s all sorts of subtle, which of course is just how Venus’s cloud tops are. This is an ultraviolet image that does reveal a little bit of striation in the clouds. Venus’s north pole is at the bottom of the image.

This view represents how Venus appeared at 1995-01-24 14:41:15 UTC

Data from the following proposal were used to create this image:
Ultraviolet Imagery of Venus

This image has been resized to 200% of its original size.

Red: WFPC2 F255W
Green: Pseudo
Blue: WFPC2 F218W

North is up.


Mars, June 2003

Mars, June 2003

I was sitting here browsing the archive when I saw some Mars imagery. I thought to myself, you know what? I’ve never done a picture of Mars. Why not? We’ve got so many robots on its surface and orbiters taking super high resolution close-up imagery, guess I figured it was pointless. Well, here’s a picture of Mars. Phobos is also hanging out at the lower right as a faint little dot. This is the south polar ice cap.

Atmosphere appears a little bluer because a near-ultraviolet filter was used in the blue channel. I thought it showed the high altitude clouds a bit better. Oh, and the occulting finger was covering part of the planet. Did my best to clean that up and fill in the blank with a bit of cloned data.

This view represents Mars as it appeared at 2003-06-28 14:32:13 UTC

Some processing notes: I used the F475W data to kind of repair the F344N data because it was overexposed along the polar ice caps.

Red: ACS/HRC F658N
Green: ACS/HRC F502N
Blue: ACS/HRC F344N+F475W

North is 20.66° counter-clockwise from up.


NGC 4474

NGC 4474

Once upon a time there was a simple galaxy, and within it lived a simple people. They made music, and art, and beautiful houses, and there was a place for everyone, and bad things never happened to anyone. The end.

Data from the following proposal were used to create this image:
The ACS Virgo Cluster Survey

Some processing notes: The chip gap was filled by making use of the galaxy’s own symmetry by simply taking the necessary strip of data from the opposite side and rotating it 180°. A smaller background galaxy that crossed over the chip gap was cloned using the same method. This approximates reality, but by no means is perfect.

Red: ACS/WFC F814W
Green: Pseudo
Blue: ACS/WFC F475W

North is up.


NGC 612

NGC 612

A dusty lenticular galaxy with an active nucleus (type II Seyfert). I am very fond of the warped disk.

Data from the following proposals were used to create this image:
Precision Measurement of Black Hole Masses in Early-Type Galaxies from the ALMA Archive
An ACS Schedule Gap Imaging Survey of Nearby Active Galaxies

Processing note: The F110W data I preferred the appearance of, dust looking less transparent, but didn’t cover the whole image. F160W was used around the outer corners where F110W didn’t reach.

Red: WFC3/IR F110W + F160W
Green: ACS/WFC F814W
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F475W

Pixel scale is ~.05" per pixel (ACS/WFC) at original size.

North is up.


Jupiter 2019 Apr 09 (near-infrared)

Jupiter 2019 Apr 09 (near-infrared)

Some of the latest Jupiter data from the HST joint observation program for the Juno probe. Jupiter here in near-infrared filters. This has become one of my favorite filter sets to view Jupiter in.

This image represents Jupiter as it would have appeared on 2019-04-09 at 14:53:52 UTC.

This image was made thanks to data collected for the following proposal:
Wide Field Coverage for Juno (WFCJ): Jupiter’s 2D Wind Field and Cloud Structure

Red: WFC3/UVIS FQ889N (id9o41ixq)
Green: WFC3/UVIS FQ727N (id9o41iyq)
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F631N (id9o41izq)

North is up.


Jupiter 2019 Apr 09 (visible)

Jupiter 2019 Apr 09 (visible)

Some of the latest Jupiter data from the HST joint observation program for the Juno probe. Jupiter here in nearly RGB filters; the equatorial limb areas look a tad bluer than they normally would because the blue channel is a near-uv filter. This also makes the Great Red Spot and some of the cloud bands look a little redder.

This image represents Jupiter as it would have appeared on 2019-04-09 at 14:53:52 UTC.

This image was made thanks to data collected for the following proposal:
Wide Field Coverage for Juno (WFCJ): Jupiter’s 2D Wind Field and Cloud Structure

Red: WFC3/UVIS F631N (id9o41izq)
Green: WFC3/UVIS F502N (id9o41j0q)
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F395N (id9o41j1q)

North is up.


Watching ATLAS

Watching ATLAS

A short animation of comet ATLAS breaking up, as observed by the Hubble Space Telescope. I cleaned up all the cosmic rays and artifacts for your viewing delight. It repeats several times since only 5 frames without a loop option would be very short indeed. In the upper right corner is a background star which is streaked because the comet moves against the background sky rather quickly.

Five observations spanning 36 minutes were used to make this animation. The proposal can be found here:
Breakup of Long-Period Comet C/2019 Y4 (ATLAS)

All channels: WFC3/UVIS F350LP

North is up.


There are more pictures at my Flickr Gallery (external link)