Latest Work

Hello, I am trying something new with my website. I mostly tend to my Flickr gallery at this point, so to reduce the upkeep and redundancy, I am using the Flickr API to pull my latest images straight from my gallery over there. Clicking on any image will simply take you to its page within my Flickr gallery (external link).

A categorical listing of work, separated into albums, is located here (external link).


Titan 2022-11-04

Titan 2022-11-04

As seen by JWST.

Grayscale "Screen": F210M
Red: F200W
Green: F150W
Blue: 140M

Titan’s north pole is up.


NGC 1566

NGC 1566

NASA / ESA / CSA / Judy Schmidt

The latest view of another dusty spiral galaxy from JWST’s MIRI. Took a bit of doing this time because the pipeline images available from the archive had a lot of alignment issues. I had to manually mosaic this. Luckily it wasn’t too difficult, or at least my human brain handled it fine. Not sure what is so confounding to a computer brain.

Red (screen layer mode): MIRI F2100W
Orange: MIRI F1130W
Cyan: MIRI F770W

Extra overall brightness in grayscale: MIRI F1000W

North is 1.5° counter-clockwise from up.


Protostar in LDN 1527

Protostar in LDN 1527

Update: Simeon Schmauß over on Twitter (@stim3on) recommended G’MIC for taking care of the horizontal noise / banding. It worked pretty great. There’s a Photoshop plugin for it, too.

Wanted to process my own version of this one, since nebular landscapes are some of my favorite views. Having a hard time with the linear noise pattern, especially near the top of the image.

In the center of this view is a newly forming star crossed by a dark disk of dust (say that three times fast!) which is casting shadows to the left and right, and allowing cones of light out the top and bottom. Think of it like a light bulb inside of a donut with a bunch of fog. Though the infrared light can penetrate much of the dust, there are clues in the image that show some of the dust is still too thick to see through. At the lower right especially are a lot of background galaxies. On the left, the background galaxies are fewer, and what we see are dimmer, so we can tell there is more dust there.

You can see the official release here. They’ve got a much better description than I could ever write.

Orange "screen": NIRCam/F444W-F470N (not arithmetic)
Red: NIRCam/F444W
Green: NIRCam/F335M
Blue: NIRCam/F200W, F187N, F115W

North is 100° counter-clockwise from up.


2-Color Widefield Jupiter

2-Color Widefield Jupiter

NASA / ESA / CSA / Jupiter ERS Team / Ricardo Hueso Alonso / Judy Schmidt

A 2-color collaboration with Ricardo Hueso. He came up with the color mapping and overall look of the image, and I reprocessed the data with a lot of inspiration from his work to fix a few cosmetic issues.

The diffraction spikes seen extending at regular angles from the brighter parts of the image were purposefully left in to highlight some of the difficulties working with data.

Orange: F212N
Cyan: F335M

Background is grayscale containing F335M data only.

Jupiter’s north pole is at the top.


3-Color Infrared Jupiter

3-Color Infrared Jupiter

NASA / ESA / CSA / Jupiter ERS Team / Judy Schmidt

A view of Jupiter seen in infrared by JWST on July 27, 2022.

A lot of work went into creating three congruent images to allow for the use of 3 color channels. Jupiter’s rapid rotation and not fitting within a single detector field makes things challenging.

Red-orange: NIRCam F360M
Yellow-green: NIRCam F212N
Cyan: NIRCam F150W2

Jupiter’s north pole is at the top.


JWST MIRI NGC1365

JWST MIRI NGC1365

Dusty, barred spiral galaxy NGC 1365. Interestingly, the dust bar isn’t nearly as prominent as it is in visible light. In the center is a modest active galactic nucleus (AGN). The circumnuclear dust is also quite striking.

This time, I was happy to receive the PHANGS team’s reduction of the data. Makes it much easier because their mosaic was much better matched and aligned.

Red (screen layer mode): MIRI F2100W
Orange: MIRI F1130W
Cyan: MIRI F770W

Extra overall brightness in grayscale: MIRI F1000W

North is not up.


Polar Ring Galaxy SPRC-45

Polar Ring Galaxy SPRC-45

From the Zoo Gems HST program. A blend of Hubble and ground-based Japanese Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) data to add color and depth to the details Hubble provides. I used a dirty trick on the HSC data to make it blend better with Hubble data… I added a fine grain/noise to it. I might be the only one in the world who adds noise instead of trying to smooth it. It looks better this way, I tell ya.

North is up.


JWST Dust NGC7496

JWST Dust NGC7496

Yes, you can use this image! The attribution line is:
NASA / ESA / CSA / Judy Schmidt

Adding a new version of NGC7496 to have the same colorization as NGC628 and IC5332. The center of this galaxy has a very bright point source known as an active galactic nucleus (AGN). You can see it’s quite different from the other two which do not have an actively accreting black hole.

Red (screen layer mode): MIRI F2100W
Orange: MIRI F1130W
Cyan: MIRI F770W

Extra overall brightness in grayscale: MIRI F1000W


JWST IC5332

JWST IC5332

Yes, you can use this image! The attribution line is:
NASA / ESA / CSA / Judy Schmidt

Dust lanes of IC533. Processed in much the same way as NGC628. A visible / Hubble view of this galaxy is here: flic.kr/p/2nxgwuB

Red (screen layer mode): MIRI F2100W
Orange: MIRI F1130W
Cyan: MIRI F770W

Extra overall brightness in grayscale: MIRI F1000W


Glowing Dust of NGC628

Glowing Dust of NGC628

Yes, you can use this image! The attribution line is:
NASA / ESA / CSA / Judy Schmidt

Squeezing some color out of the various filters showing all the glowing dust in the center of NGC628.

Red (screen layer mode): MIRI F2100W
Orange: MIRI F1130W
Cyan: MIRI F770W

Extra overall brightness in grayscale: MIRI F1000W


There are more pictures at my Flickr Gallery (external link)