Latest Work

Hello, I am trying something new with my website. I mostly tend to my Flickr gallery at this point, so to reduce the upkeep and redundancy, I am using the Flickr API to pull my latest images straight from my gallery over there. Clicking on any image will simply take you to its page within my Flickr gallery (external link).

A categorical listing of work, separated into albums, is located here (external link).


JWST Dust NGC7496

JWST Dust NGC7496

Yes, you can use this image! The attribution line is:
NASA / ESA / CSA / Judy Schmidt

Adding a new version of NGC7496 to have the same colorization as NGC628 and IC5332. The center of this galaxy has a very bright point source known as an active galactic nucleus (AGN). You can see it’s quite different from the other two which do not have an actively accreting black hole.

Red (screen layer mode): MIRI F2100W
Orange: MIRI F1130W
Cyan: MIRI F770W

Extra overall brightness in grayscale: MIRI F1000W


JWST IC5332

JWST IC5332

Yes, you can use this image! The attribution line is:
NASA / ESA / CSA / Judy Schmidt

Dust lanes of IC533. Processed in much the same way as NGC628. A visible / Hubble view of this galaxy is here: flic.kr/p/2nxgwuB

Red (screen layer mode): MIRI F2100W
Orange: MIRI F1130W
Cyan: MIRI F770W

Extra overall brightness in grayscale: MIRI F1000W


Glowing Dust of NGC628

Glowing Dust of NGC628

Yes, you can use this image! The attribution line is:
NASA / ESA / CSA / Judy Schmidt

Squeezing some color out of the various filters showing all the glowing dust in the center of NGC628.

Red (screen layer mode): MIRI F2100W
Orange: MIRI F1130W
Cyan: MIRI F770W

Extra overall brightness in grayscale: MIRI F1000W


JWST Dust NGC7496

JWST Dust NGC7496

Yes, you can use this image! The attribution line is:
NASA / ESA / CSA / Judy Schmidt

A combination of NIRCam and MIRI filters to show continuum and emission line dust in NGC7496.

A version combining this with HST data is here: flic.kr/p/2nyVKv5

JWST Filter Combination:
Cyan: [mathematical operation] NIRCam F335M-(NIRCam F300M+NIRCam F360W)
Orange: MIRI F770W
Luminosity (grayscale): MIRI F770W


JWST+HST NGC7496

JWST+HST NGC7496

Yes, you can use this image! The attribution line is:
NASA / ESA / CSA / Judy Schmidt

As I work through trying out different ways to combine the data, this method stood out as particularly pretty, even if it lacks immediate scientific clarity. The glowing strands and flocks of dust, which would normally be dark in visible light imagery, are instead bright and glowing with infrared light from JWST.

A version showing just JWST data (dust) is here: flic.kr/p/2nyXMye

This galaxy in visible light from HST only is available here:
flic.kr/p/2nhEraF

Data from the PHANGS-HST program were used to create this image.
archive.stsci.edu/proposal_search.php?mission=hst&id=...

More on PHANGS here:
phangs.stsci.edu/

Some processing notes and filter combinations:

JWST Filter Combination:
Cyan: [mathematical operation] NIRCam F335M-(NIRCam F300M+NIRCam F360W)
Orange: MIRI F770W
Luminosity (grayscale): MIRI F770W


JWST data are overlaid on HST data with a Photoshop screen layer mode.

HST Filter Combination:
Red: WFC3/UVIS F814W
Green: WFC3/UVIS F555W
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F438W+F336W+F275W

The upper right corner of the HST data was filled with cloned data to get rid of a hard edge where HST data were missing.

North is 83.25° counter-clockwise from up.


JWST Jupiter

JWST Jupiter

Yes, you can use this image! The attribution line is:
NASA / ESA / CSA / Judy Schmidt

A very processed (maybe even over-processed) version of Jupiter from JWST. Here we’re viewing the planet only in infrared, and the ring, usually invisible, is plain for all to see. The colors are definitely unusual.

There is some discussion over what the red blip at the south pole and the disconnected layer of atmosphere on the eastern limb are. Real? Artifacts? We’ll wait for the scientists to figure it out, but I’m leaning toward real. :)

Red (screen): NIRCam F322W2-F323N (this is not a subtraction function, both filters were used at the same time)
Blue: NIRCam F212N

Background is a grayscale combination of both filters. There were gaps in the data that had to be filled in using either filter to complete the other.


IC 5332

IC 5332

Put this together rather quickly this morning while the little one was distracted by Badanamu… Kind of a difficult target. Not the brightest galaxy, but the spiral pattern is very nice. I wish the signal to noise ratio was a bit better.

Data from the PHANGS-HST program were used to create this image.
archive.stsci.edu/proposal_search.php?mission=hst&id=...

More on PHANGS here:
phangs.stsci.edu/

Red: WFC3/UVIS F814W
Green: WFC3/UVIS F555W
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F438W+F336W+F275W

North is 35.43° counter-clockwise from up.


NGC 7496

NGC 7496

A beautiful spiral galaxy, flecked with blue clusters of young stars, and striped with intertwining dust.

I had to remove a rather significant red light scatter caused by a bright star just outside the field of view. Luckily it was almost completely contained in the red filter (it’s a very red star) so I could borrow some data from the green filter to fill in where the glint was too harsh to remove otherwise.

Data from the PHANGS-HST program were used to create this image.
archive.stsci.edu/proposal_search.php?mission=hst&id=...

More on PHANGS here:
phangs.stsci.edu/

Red: WFC3/UVIS F814W
Green: WFC3/UVIS F555W
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F438W+F336W+F275W

North is 20.00° clockwise from up.


Hickson Compact Group 40

Hickson Compact Group 40

Hubble turned 32 yesterday. This was the target chosen to celebrate that event. Tight groupings such as this are a relatively rare sight, and this one is so compact that there are multiple overlapping galaxies along our line of sight.

Anyway, just thought I’d share my version of it. I wanted to show it with a lighter background and a more gentle touch on the color saturation levels. There’s an H-alpha filter available. I chose not to use it.

You can see the official version over yonder.

Red: WFC3/UVIS F814W
Green: WFC3/UVIS F606W
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F475W

North is NOT up. It is 41.6° counter-clockwise from up.


Arp 143

Arp 143

Interacting galaxies NGC 2444 (top) and NGC 2445 putting on a show for us humans to enjoy and contemplate. I originally processed this image as an HST+a ground-based combo image to try and generate a meager color image. Needless to say the full Hubble version knocks the socks off the previous one.

Besides all the cool things going on here such as the unusual arcs around the center of the lower, star-forming galaxy, the upper, elliptical galaxy has some interesting subtle things going on, too. If you look very hard, or maybe it’s easy for you if you know what you’re looking for, you may notice a greenish hue around the nucleus of the elliptical.

Normally if I get a result like that I think it’s a problem with the processing, but in this case I believe this galaxy is actually colored like that due to having borrowed some shiny new blue stars from its collisional friend. The yellow older stars are mixing with the blues to give this slightly "off" appearance of the colors in the elliptical, which are typically all smoothly yellowish, being comprised entirely of an older bunch of cooler, long-lived stars.

I went ahead and posted this after STScI’s official release, because I didn’t want to accidentally "scoop" them and make their shiny new release old news… I very nearly did, but a chat with Julianne prevented that. I’m trying not to be a jerk, I swear. hubblesite.org/contents/media/images/2022/010/01F88FMDEP5…

Red overlay: WFC3/UVIS F665N
Red-Orange: ACS/WFC F814W
Green: ACS/WFC F606W
Blue: ACS/WFC F475W

North is NOT up. It is 21.99° counter-clockwise from up.


There are more pictures at my Flickr Gallery (external link)