Latest Work

Hello, I am trying something new with my website. I mostly tend to my Flickr gallery at this point, so to reduce the upkeep and redundancy, I am using the Flickr API to pull my latest images straight from my gallery over there. Clicking on any image will simply take you to its page within my Flickr gallery (external link).

A categorical listing of work, separated into albums, is located here (external link).


IC 5063 Darkened AGN Cones

IC 5063 Darkened AGN Cones

To the left, a minimally processed, cleaned up image of IC 5063. Note the cones are just barely visible, but they were defined enough for me to question whether they were real or not. Upon further inspection they are indeed real, and the right side shows a heavily processed version which is intended to make the cones more readily discernible.

What are these cones? As of writing, currently not sure, but speculation (in no particular order) includes shadows in the interstellar medium (ISM), the ISM being cleared out by winds from the active galactic nucleus (AGN) and dimmed starlight. I have my doubts about dimmed starlight and favor the other two. It could also turn out to be none of those, but my bet would be on ISM clearing or ISM shadows. Update: Add X-shaped bulge to the list.

Data for this image come from Aaron Barth’s Survey of Nearby Active Galaxies: archive.stsci.edu/proposal_search.php?mission=hst&id=...

NOTE: Data scaled up 126.20% (matches WFC3/UVIS scale)

All channels: ACS/WFC F814W

North is 3.29° clockwise from up.


Arp 24

Arp 24

Interesting galaxy with some vague spiral rotational patterns to it, and a bright node at the end of an arm. Looks a bit like a smaller dwarf merging with a larger dwarf irregular galaxy.

A widefield color view is available at the Legacy Survey viewer: legacysurvey.org/viewer?ra=163.6506&dec=56.9876&l…

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

All Channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 16.86° clockwise from up.


AM 2105-632

AM 2105-632

A spiral galaxy that recently went through some interactive process, resulting in some stars strewn hither and thither. This viewpoint allows us to see that sections of the disk have been inclined away from the original plane of the galaxy. Dust fades into the background as soon as it loses its stellar backlight.

A nice, color, widefield view of this galaxy is available at the Legacy Survey viewer: legacysurvey.org/viewer?ra=317.3111&dec=-63.2898&...

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

All Channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 53.04° clockwise from up.


Arp 158

Arp 158

I think there are at least two galaxies here in the midst of a very confusing merger. I mean, all mergers and many galaxies are confusing to some extent, but this one really confuses me. I’ve marked what I think are two galactic nuclei.  On the other hand, it looks a bit like a snake turning its head and opening its mouth, which is cool.

There is a faint line going diagonally across the left half of the image. This is possibly some space junk or some other small object that is close to Earth. I normally remove these, but this one is less obtrusive, making it a good example without detracting too much from the image. Sometimes these are much brighter, and are a big hassle to deal with.

A widefield version is available from the Legacy Survey viewer: legacysurvey.org/viewer?ra=21.3389&dec=34.0239&la…

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

All Channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 23.44° clockwise from up.


Arp 216

Arp 216

Stellar streams looping around a disturbed spiral galaxy with a bit of dust and star formation evident. A widefield view shows barred spiral galaxy NGC 7682 just to the east. NGC 7682 seems relatively undisturbed by comparison, so one wonders if the two have anything to do with one another.

Check the color widefield view from Legacy Survey here: legacysurvey.org/viewer?ra=352.1989&dec=3.5200&la…

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

All Channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 50.87° counter-clockwise from up.


Arp 100

Arp 100

Quite a long galaxy, stretched out due to some kind of recent interaction. Exactly what, I’m not sure. A rather large, diffuse filter ghost (faint, slightly brighter annular feature) is overlapping the right side of the image. There are two bright stars flanking this galaxy to the east or west. Either one could be the culprit, though I think the one to the west was responsible.

Check the widefield view out at the Legacy Survey to get a better view of the situation: legacysurvey.org/viewer?ra=7.1450&dec=-11.5858&la…

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

(I might have hit this one too hard with the noise reduction. It looks funny.)

All Channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 59.33° counter-clockwise from up.


Arp 59

Arp 59

While pleasing to the eye, this galaxy seems less peculiar than some of the other galaxies in Arp’s catalog. Given that he was looking for ejections from the centers of galaxies, I am guessing he was interested in the very bright piece of arm that seems somewhat broken off from the rest of the galaxy. Looks like a lot of star formation, there.

A color widefield view is available at the Legacy Survey viewer: legacysurvey.org/viewer?ra=15.1909&dec=-9.1851&la…

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

All Channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 0.97° counter-clockwise from up.


Arp 314

Arp 314

Trying to get caught up on some galaxies from Prop15446 again. Here is a pair of interacting galaxies. Visible at the bottom left edge is a third member. Another galaxy that may have had an encounter with this group is not visible within the image.

You can see a beautiful widefield color view from the Legacy Survey viewer:
legacysurvey.org/viewer?ra=344.5309&dec=-3.7903&l…

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

All Channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 1.40° clockwise from up.


NGC 2775

NGC 2775

2019 Nov 15: Phil Plait wrote an amazing article about this galaxy! www.syfy.com/syfywire/a-flocculent-spiral-galaxy-with-a-r…

A perfect donut of a galaxy.

Data from the following proposal were used to create this image:
PHANGS-HST: Linking Stars and Gas throughout the Scales of Star Formation

Red: WFC3/UVIS F814W
Green: WFC3/UVIS F555W
Blue : WFC3/UVIS F438W+F336W+F275W

North is 60.08 clockwise from up.


NGC 1805

NGC 1805

This is a globular cluster located in the outskirts of the Large Magellanic Cloud. The reason it looks so colorful is because it was imaged in red/near-infrared (the red channel filter overlaps both) and near-ultraviolet. HST is one of the only observatories still in operation capable of ultraviolet observations due to its location above Earth’s atmosphere. Astronomers are especially keen to make use of its ultraviolet abilities before the harsh environment of space takes its inevitable toll on the telescope. Yes, the telescope will eventually stop working altogether, but even before that happens, the detectors which pick up ultraviolet light are also quickly losing sensitivity.

Globular clusters typically take on an overall muted yellow color in visible spectrum images, but the near-infrared and near-ultraviolet filters are very good at highlighting what might otherwise be subtle differences and the result is a beautifully colorful image. You might also notice the faint red apparitions of galaxies in the background. They are relatively faint in ultraviolet light, so they appear unusually red in this particular image, but their shapes are unmistakably galactic.

Data from the following proposals were used to create this image.
Which stars go BOOM?
Multiple Stellar Populations in Young Magellanic Cloud Clusters

Red: WFC3/UVIS F814W
Green: WFC3/UVIS F336W
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F225W

North is 2.3° clockwise from up.


There are more pictures at my Flickr Gallery (external link)