Latest Work

Hello, I am trying something new with my website. I mostly tend to my Flickr gallery at this point, so to reduce the upkeep and redundancy, I am using the Flickr API to pull my latest images straight from my gallery over there. Clicking on any image will simply take you to its page within my Flickr gallery (external link).

A categorical listing of work, separated into albums, is located here (external link).


Northern NGC 205

Northern NGC 205

Also known as M110, this is a close-up view of Andromeda’s famous dwarf elliptical satellite. This patch was imaged several times over in a search for variable stars, RR Lyrae in particular, in order to study the distances to these stars. Looking more at the proposal abstract for these observations, one realizes how slow science can be sometimes. In order to view the proper motions of stars within this galaxy, further observations will have to be taken 8-12 years from now, with perhaps even more in the future. Will Hubble survive that long? Will future telescopes be launched to pick up where Hubble left off? We’ll just have to wait and see.

Some processing notes:
The chip gap was filled with cloned data to make it unobtrusive. It’s not perfectly done, nor was it intended to be a perfect match. You should be able to tell there is a very faintly darker band horizontal across the image about halfway down—where the gap was. Some charge bleeds were also covered with cloned data. Given the nature of studying variable stars, these are some of my favorite data to process because it is very easy to eliminate all of the cosmic rays from the image using a median stack method. So everything you see here is a real star or galaxy, and not an artifact. The noise level is also exceptionally low.

Data from the following ambitious proposal were used to create this image:
https://archive.stsci.edu/proposal_search.php?mission=hst&id=15902

Red: ACS/WFC F814W
Green: Pseudo
Blue: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 26.1° counter-clockwise from up.


NGC 1317

NGC 1317

Also catalogued (accidentally?) as NGC 1318, NGC 1317 is a barred spiral galaxy with a wreath of bright star formation around its nucleus. These Hubble observations are not especially deep, but are still adequate to make out some of the fainter outer arms of the spiral. A much deeper view is available from ESO, also showing its line-of-sight companion NGC 1316. It’s possible that the two are interacting, but also possible that they are too far away from one another, since NGC 1317 appears unperturbed, even while NGC 1316 has clearly interacted recently, given its obvious and multiple tidal tails.

Data from the illustrious PHANGS-HST program were used to create this image.
archive.stsci.edu/proposal_search.php?mission=hst&id=...

More on PHANGS here:
phangs.stsci.edu/

Red: WFC3/UVIS F814W
Green: WFC3/UVIS F555W
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F438W+F336W+F275W

North is 68.0° clockwise from up.


NGC 4548

NGC 4548

For your Friday, a beautiful barred spiral galaxy flecked with blue dots and splotches of star formation, along with plenty of dust floating about. About half or so of the galaxy is contained within the frame. The rest didn’t fit, unfortunately.

Data from the illustrious PHANGS-HST program were used to create this image.
archive.stsci.edu/proposal_search.php?mission=hst&id=...

More on PHANGS here:
phangs.stsci.edu/


Red: WFC3/UVIS F814W
Green: WFC3/UVIS F555W
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F438W+F336W+F275W

North is 12.4° counter-clockwise from up.


NGC 4571

NGC 4571

For your enjoyment. A low-surface brightness spiral galaxy with many bright blue clusters of star formation in its arms. Despite its dimness, or perhaps because of it, the young star clusters are very apparent in this galaxy.

Data from the illustrious PHANGS-HST program were used to create this image.
archive.stsci.edu/proposal_search.php?mission=hst&id=...

More on PHANGS here:
phangs.stsci.edu/


Red: WFC3/UVIS F814W
Green: WFC3/UVIS F555W
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F438W+F336W+F275W

North is 19° counter-clockwise from up.


NGC 4298

NGC 4298

Flocculent spiral galaxy NGC 4298 as seen with the Hubble Space Telescope. It is in an apparent interacting pair with NGC 4302.

This has been processed almost identically to my version of NGC 4254: flic.kr/p/2k2ZeEa

Care was taken with the bright foreground star to rotate the diffraction spikes in just the F555W data so that they all matched. Some filter ghosts were also removed to help beautify the lone star.

I can’t tell whether the front of the galaxy is at the top of the image or the bottom. I might be displaying it upside-down, if you know what I mean, not that there is an up or a down in space.

Data from the illustrious PHANGS-HST program were used to create this image.
archive.stsci.edu/proposal_search.php?mission=hst&id=...

Data from the anniversary program for Hubble’s 27th birthday also comprise the F555W portions of this image.
WFC3 imaging of galaxy pair NGC 4298 and NGC 4302

More on PHANGS here:
phangs.stsci.edu/


Red: WFC3/UVIS F814W
Green: WFC3/UVIS F555W
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F438W+F336W+F275W

North is 36.3° clockwise from up.


NGC 4254

NGC 4254

Grand design spiral galaxy NGC 4254 or Messier 99 seen as only Hubble can see, with a full set of nearly visible light red, blue, and green filters, with extra near-ultraviolet data to make those young blue star clusters pop.

Data from the illustrious PHANGS-HST program were used to create this image.
archive.stsci.edu/proposal_search.php?mission=hst&id=...

More on PHANGS here:
phangs.stsci.edu/

A single F814W exposure also uses data from the following proposal:
PTF10fqs: A Luminous Red Nova in the Spiral Messier 99

Red: WFC3/UVIS F814W
Green: WFC3/UVIS F555W
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F438W+F336W+F275W

North is 26.9° counter-clockwise from up.


8 Micron Spitzer View of the Galactic Core

8 Micron Spitzer View of the Galactic Core

The same mosaics from this view except using the 8 micron data for luminosity, and the other three channels for color. This significantly reduces the starlight signal, though not totally. Still makes it much easier to see the dust and emission nebulas.

Note that much of the nebulosity is in the foreground as we view the Milky Way’s center through one of the arms of the Milky Way. It is difficult to discern or even measure the distance to each piece, but generally, the larger structures that extend far away from flat central plane are foreground objects, while thinner, smaller pieces that remain close to the plane are closer to the core. Many of these smaller objects are overlapped and obscured by mid and foreground objects.

Luminosity: 8.0 µm (IRAC4)
Red: 5.8 µm (IRAC3)
Green: 4.5 µm (IRAC2)
Blue: 3.6 µm (IRAC1)

The image is presented in galactic coordinates, with north up in that regard.


A Reprocessed Spitzer View of the Galactic Core

A Reprocessed Spitzer View of the Galactic Core

This is a view using FITS file mosaics generously provided courtesy of Susan Stolovy, with attribution to Rick Arendt and Solange Ramirez for their work in producing the final mosaics. Her team used a processing technique that alleviated some of the saturation issues arising in some of the brighter parts of the mosaic that one might find in the mosaics provided by the Spitzer archive.

My take is not necessarily much different than what’s already been done, but it is quite a bit less saturated than what you can find on the Spitzer website, and just a bit more of those wispy dust and gas formations can be made out. Anyway, it’s nice to work with some data where someone else has already done most of the work.

For reference, here is a link to the original version using the same wavelengths on the Spitzer website: www.spitzer.caltech.edu/images/1540-ssc2006-02a-A-Cauldro…

Screen: 8.0 µm (IRAC4)
Red: 5.8 µm (IRAC3)
Green: 4.5 µm (IRAC2)
Blue: 3.6 µm (IRAC1)

The image is presented in galactic coordinates, with north up in that regard.


NGC 2336

NGC 2336

Recent observations revealing the many-armed, beautiful spiral galaxy NGC 2336 as only Hubble can. The imagery used to create this image was taken in January 2020. Meanwhile, the Chandra X-ray Observatory is also tasked with looking at this galaxy, though I haven’t looked into the details of that, yet.

Edit: Checked on CXO observations, and so far none yet, but I did notice that of the proposed 200 kilosecond time, they only gave Dr. Antoniou 50 ks. Ouch! Here’s hoping that’s enough.

Data from the following proposal was used to create this image:
Determining How X-ray Binary Populations Vary Through Time

Note there are a number of blank areas in the image where data were absent. I filled those with background-matched noise to make them visually unobtrusive. Some other areas also lack a full range of color, being only covered by 1-2 filters.

The pixel scale is 0.05 arcseconds per pixel.

Red: ACS/WFC F814W
Green: ACS/WFC F555W
Blue: ACS/WFC F435W

North is exactly to the right.


NGC 6684

NGC 6684

Not quite elliptical, not quite a spiral… it’s lenticular. Love these subtle, ghostly galaxies. Very little dust or star formation to speak of, leaving the stellar structure plainly visible, though highly diffuse.

Data from the following ambitious proposal were used to create this image: Every Known Nearby Galaxy

Red: ACS/WFC F814W
Green: Pseudo
Blue: ACS/WFC F606W


There are more pictures at my Flickr Gallery (external link)