Latest Work

Hello, I am trying something new with my website. I mostly tend to my Flickr gallery at this point, so to reduce the upkeep and redundancy, I am using the Flickr API to pull my latest images straight from my gallery over there. Clicking on any image will simply take you to its page within my Flickr gallery (external link).

A categorical listing of work, separated into albums, is located here (external link).


HH111

HH111

Took a quick break from some other work to process these lovely near-infrared observations of HH111 into a color image. The jets are well hidden from view in visible light, only just peeking out at one end. Here, many details are revealed, but the stars themselves remain veiled. Herbig-Haro objects are comprised of matter ejected rapidly from the poles of young, actively accreting stellar objects. Sometimes they are isolated puffs of cloud, but this time they are narrow, almost continuous streams. In this case it is probable that a multi-star system is forming: hubblesite.org/contents/news-releases/2000/news-2000-05.html

Orange: WFC3/IR F167N + WFC3/IR F164N
Cyan: WFC3/IR F130N + WFC3/IR F126N

North is 40° counter-clockwise from up.


AM 0313-545

AM 0313-545

Saw this drop into the archive this morning and knew what I had to do. Two spirals interacting in some way, though I find it very difficult to interpret the image in order to place them spatially. It looks like the smaller one is fully behind, although it could be partially within the larger galaxy. I’m really not sure!

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

All Channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 57.06° counter-clockwise from up.


Expansion of SNR0509 Over 10 Years

Expansion of SNR0509 Over 10 Years

Presented here is an animation of the supernova remnant SNR J0509.5-6731 expanding over time. It appears to be moving at close to 2% of the speed of light. It is around 163000 light years distant, so it has to move quite speedily for us to be able to witness its movement on a human timescale. The first frame is from 2006, and the second is from 2016. The video shows the two frames blinking back and forth to make the motion easy to see.

Note that only the narrowband (seen here as the red, smooth outline of the nebula) was available to show the nebula’s expansion. The star field is essentially a static image, though the narrowband data did also capture some star movement, particularly the bright star to the left of the frame. The Chandra data was simply scaled up to match with the expansion of the shell in the Hubble data.

A still image is available here: flic.kr/p/2heTvq9

Flickr shrank this video down, so you may prefer a larger version at Youtube:
youtu.be/YZUJysgK6Us

Hubble proposals used:
The Proper Motion of Supernova Remnant E0509-67.5
Single-Degenerate or Double-Degenerate? The Case for a Third Epoch Observation of the Confirmed Ia Supernova Remnant 0509-67.5
A Search for Surviving Companions of Type Ia Supernovae in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Hubble Heritage 2.0

Chandra data:
Red: .10-.70 keV
Green: .70-1.0 keV
Blue: 1.00-5.00 keV
(Obs IDs 776, 7635, 8554)

Hubble data:
Red screen: ACS/WFC F658N
Red: WFC3/UVIS F814W
Green: WFC3/UVIS F555W
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F475W

North is up.


SNR J0509.5-6731

SNR J0509.5-6731

A supernova remnant with a smooth outer shell in hydrogen emission, and a clumpy inner x-ray shell. The hydrogen emission is shown here in red, while the clumpy x-ray emission is shown in blues, greens, and pinks.

I almost didn’t finish this, because what I was doing was almost exactly the same as had already been done beautifully, and I try not to redo things. It ended up quite interesting however when I realized there were multiple frames from different years that could be used to show the expansion of the bubble over time. An animation of that is here: flic.kr/p/2heWSpn

Hubble proposals used:
The Proper Motion of Supernova Remnant E0509-67.5
Single-Degenerate or Double-Degenerate? The Case for a Third Epoch Observation of the Confirmed Ia Supernova Remnant 0509-67.5
A Search for Surviving Companions of Type Ia Supernovae in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Hubble Heritage 2.0

Chandra data:
Red: .10-.70 keV
Green: .70-1.0 keV
Blue: 1.00-5.00 keV
(Obs IDs 776, 7635, 8554)

Hubble data:
Red screen: ACS/WFC F658N
Red: WFC3/UVIS F814W
Green: WFC3/UVIS F555W
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F475W

North is up.


LMC N63A in X-ray and Visible Light

LMC N63A in X-ray and Visible Light

Took an older picture I’d already processed from HST and tried overlaying the x-rays. This supernova remnant has a reddish/cooler x-ray rim with a bluer/hotter interior. Interestingly, the part brightest in visible light, which some call the firefox, is the dimmest part of the x-ray emitting nebula, but also apparently the hottest.

A Hubble-only view that I did a while back is here: flic.kr/p/MqXcQX

The upper left and lower right and a few other smaller places are missing data. I’ve put some fake data in there to make it less distracting, but it should be just noticeable if one looks closely.

Hubble proposals used:
High Resolution Imaging of Bubble and Superbubbles in HII Regions
Supernova Remnants in a Cloudy Interstellar Medium

Chandra data:
Red: .10-.70 keV
Green: .70-1.0 keV
Blue: 1.00-5.50 keV
(A single exposure from 2000, Obs ID 777)

Hubble data:
Orange: F673N WFPC2/WF
Cyan: F656N WFPC2/WF
Blue: F502N WFPC2/WF

North is up.


Supernova Remnant N103B & Planetary Nebula

Supernova Remnant N103B & Planetary Nebula

N103B is seen here glowing in nacreous colored x-rays from CXO overlaid upon its visible counterpart from HST glowing red in hydrogen and greenish oxygen emission.

Coincidentally, and wonderfully, a bright planetary nebula is glowing a greenish yellow hue to the lower right, seen against a reddish, larger gaseous emission nebula which surrounds the young double star cluster NGC 1850 that exists just outside the frame.

This is all happening within our small, neighboring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. We are lucky to have the LMC as there are many neat things to see within it, but it is not so far away that they are too small to make out.

Hubble data from the following proposals were used to create the image:
A Search for Surviving Companions of Type Ia Supernovae in the Large Magellanic Cloud
N103B: A Type Ia Remnant with Circumstellar Interaction… Kepler’s Older Cousin?

Chandra data:
Red: .10-.90 keV
Green: .90-1.20 keV
Blue: 1.20-10.0 keV
(All 12 of Willams’s observations from 2018)

Hubble data:
40% Luminosity: WFC3/UVIS F657N
Red screen: WFC3/UVIS F656N
Cyan screen: WFC3/UVIS F502N
Red: WFC3/UVIS F814W
Green: WFC3/UVIS F555W
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F475W

North is up.


SNR J0505.7-6752

SNR J0505.7-6752

Another supernova remnant from the Large Magellanic Cloud, seen by Hubble and Chandra in visible, near-infrared, and x-ray light. This time I’ve overlapped two color images together, because I heard you like color so I put color in your color so you can look at color while you look at color.

Hubble data from the following proposal was used to create the image:
A Search for Surviving Companions of Type Ia Supernovae in the Large Magellanic Cloud

Chandra data:
Red: .30-.70 keV
Green: .70-.80 keV
Blue: .80-4.20 keV
(Obs IDs 3876 & 4440)

Hubble data:
Red Screen & 30% Luminosity: WFC3/UVIS F656N
Red: WFC3/UVIS F814W
Green: WFC3/UVIS F555W
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F475W

North is 48.38° clockwise from up.


SNR J0534.2-7033 HST+CXO

SNR J0534.2-7033 HST+CXO

A supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud from Hubble and Chandra (visible and x-ray light).

Hubble only version: flic.kr/p/2h7ykXj
Chandra only version: flic.kr/p/2h7wtqw

Chandra data:
Violet / Magenta overlay: ACIS .30-2.00 keV

Hubble data:
Red Screen & 50% Luminosity: WFC3/UVIS F565N
Red: WFC3/UVIS F814W
Green: WFC3/UVIS F555W
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F475W

North is 8.55° counter-clockwise from up.


SNR J0534.2-7033 HST

SNR J0534.2-7033 HST

A supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud from Hubble, seen in visible and near-infrared wideband and narrowband H-alpha filters. The remnant is old and faint. Stars in the LMC form a screen of confusion to cover up the remnant edges, but narrowband imagery can be quite helpful to reveal it.

Hubble+Chandra version: flic.kr/p/2h7ympS
Chandra only version: flic.kr/p/2h7wtqw

Red Screen & 50% Luminosity: WFC3/UVIS F565N
Red: WFC3/UVIS F814W
Green: WFC3/UVIS F555W
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F475W

North is NOT up. It is 8.55° counter-clockwise from up.


SNR J0534.2-7033 CXO

SNR J0534.2-7033 CXO

A supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud from Chandra, seen in x-ray light.

I did the color filtering differently this time, following the example given on this page: hea-www.harvard.edu/ChandraSNR/SNRJ0534.2-7033/chandra_im…

Truth be told, and I’d never deny it, I still don’t really know what I’m doing when I work with Chandra data. I mean, I can smooth it decently, but when it comes to picking and understanding the energy levels to assign colors to, it’s not something I know much about.

Anyway, this is not the longest exposure ever, so it’s pretty noisy, which you can probably still see despite the attempt at smoothing.

Hubble+Chandra version: flic.kr/p/2h7ympS
Hubble only version: flic.kr/p/2h7ykXj

Red: .30-.80 keV
Green: .80-1.10 keV
Blue: 1.10-2.00 keV

North is 8.55° counter-clockwise from up.


There are more pictures at my Flickr Gallery (external link)