Latest Work

Hello, I am trying something new with my website. I mostly tend to my Flickr gallery at this point, so to reduce the upkeep and redundancy, I am using the Flickr API to pull my latest images straight from my gallery over there. Clicking on any image will simply take you to its page within my Flickr gallery (external link).

A categorical listing of work, separated into albums, is located here (external link).


ARP156

ARP156

Things have been rough for this galaxy. There are stellar streams strewn all about, the dust disk is warped all over the place, and there’s hardly any star formation going on. That’s what makes it so cool, though. I love the way the dust disk is pushed and pulled around, but still maintains semblance to a disk.

BONUS: If you look down at the bottom, next to the two red stars, there’s the cutest little hourglass nebula I’ve ever seen. I think it’s a planetary nebula, anyway. It’s either a planetary nebula that’s fairly typical, or the weirdest galaxy I’ve ever seen. I’ll defer to Occam’s razor for this one.

Color from SDSS again. Data for that may be found here:
dr12.sdss.org/fields/name?name=arp156

NASA/ESA/SDSS/Judy Schmidt

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

Luminosity: ACS/WFC F606W
Red: SDSS i
Green: SDSS r
Blue: SDSS g

North is 37.73° clockwise from up.


ARP 283

ARP 283

An interacting pair of galaxies also known as NGC 2799 (left) & NGC 2798 (right). NGC 2799 appears warped, and seems to be getting ripped apart. Rain comes to mind when looking at this, like the stars and gas of the blue galaxy are mere particles condensing and falling into the red galaxy like rain. It’s probably nothing like rain, though.

Color comes from SDSS this time, which is always a pleasure. As far as surveys go, it’s very easy to work with. Data for this field can be found here:
dr12.sdss.org/fields/name?name=ngc+2799

NASA/ESA/SDSS/Judy Schmidt

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

Luminosity: ACS/WFC F606W
Red: SDSS i
Green: SDSS r
Blue: SDSS g

North is 13.50° clockwise from up.


AM 1914-603 (Color)

AM 1914-603 (Color)

Color added by using this ESO image under a CC BY 4.0 license. Please include ESO in the attribution if using this image, like so:
NASA/ESA/ESO/Judy Schmidt

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

Luminosity: ACS/WFC F606W
Red: Melipal/VIMOS V (550 nm)
Green: Melipal/VIMOS B (425 nm)
Blue: Melipal/VIMOS U (380 nm)

North is 1.37° counter-clockwise from up.


AM 1914-603

AM 1914-603

Fabulous pair of interacting galaxies. Wish I had color data.

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

All channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 1.37° counter-clockwise from up.


AM 0619-271

AM 0619-271

A magnificent barred spiral galaxy with arms tightly wound into near continuous circles. This was colorized using PanSTARRS z/i/g survey data. I processed the center somewhat heavily to make the lines of dust more apparent.

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

Luminosity: ACS/WFC F606W
Red: PanSTARRS z
Green: PanSTARRS i
Blue: PanSTARRS g

North is 45.34° counter-clockwise from up.


AM 2224-310

AM 2224-310

Another disturbed galaxy with a vaguely disk-like, spiral shape. This one takes up a smaller footprint on the detector and appears less detailed because of this. A coincidentally placed Milky Way star sits near the brightest part of the galaxy. One might be tempted to think it is some unusual active nucleus in a low mass galaxy, but one would be wrong… (I thought it was one, at first.)

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

All channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 32.23° clockwise from up.


AM 0311-573

AM 0311-573

Dusty, peculiar spiral galaxy with apparently only one arm, if it can be considered an arm. One wonders if the apparent disk shape is true or merely a line-of-sight illusion. Clustered texture to the stars indicates a lot of star formation is probably going on.

Another one from Prop 15446. Couldn’t find an appropriate color source for this one. DSS was about it, and that wouldn’t be much better than completely artificial color. V* TW Hor, a fairly bright star, lies about 4.75’ northwest (off the bottom of this frame) from the galaxy, further complicating the use of survey data.

Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

All channels: ACS/WFC F606W

North is 106.03° clockwise from up.


ARP219

ARP219

A couple of entwined galaxies proceeding with their mergence. The two tails appear to wrap all the way around the left side of the galaxies and connect back where that background spiral appears at the bottom of the image. They’d be off the left and bottom sides of the frame if you could see them, but the exposure wasn’t quite long enough to capture such faint features.

This is part of a snapshot / gap filler program for Julianne Dalcanton involving the study of peculiar galaxies which HST had never observed before. Only one filter is available for each, so color must come from elsewhere. In this case, I used the PanSTARRS survey to quickly add some color. You can see that many of the fine details in the image are lacking distinctive colors due to the lower resolution of the color data.

All of the observations from this proposal are available immediately to the public, so it can be fun to poke around. In fact HST took this image only a few hours before I made this image, and less than 24 hours before I posted it here.

Here’s a link to the proposal abstract:
Establishing HST’s Low Redshift Archive of Interacting Systems

Luminosity: ACS/WFC F606W
Red: PanSTARRS z
Green: PanSTARRS i
Blue: PanSTARRS g

North is up.


Ghosts of Trees

Ghosts of Trees

An illustration I never really finished.


Light and Shadow around Haro5a

Light and Shadow around Haro5a

Just a pretty scene a small distance north of the bright part of the Orion Nebula. Near-infrared imagery allows us to see quite a bit more than we normally might. Almost anything bright you see here is a hole in a denser cloud of dust where stars are forming. The stars blow holes out of the clouds as they are forming, leaving some gaps for light to escape.

This is only a single filter image, so none of the color is real. It has only been added for visual interest.

All channels: WFC3/IR F160W

North is 27.26° clockwise from up.


There are more pictures at my Flickr Gallery (external link)